Built By Alpine Log Homes - Protected By Perma-Chink Systems

 Alpine Log Homes In The Snow

A 21-year-old treasure

Those of us that have been in the industry for 20 or more years will remember. Alpine Log Homes was one of the industry leaders in the design and build of handcrafted log homes. For example, this beautiful home in the mountains of Glenwood Springs, Colorado was built by Alpine Log Homes 21 years ago. I know you would prefer to see a photo with Spring flowers and green leaves by now, but it is a reality of the Colorado mountains have snow in April! Yes, the photo above was taken in early April of 2023. Indeed, the winters in the Colorado mountains can be long and present extreme conditions for any home. But it is not just the winter months that pose challenges to log homes. This log home experiences on average 12+ feet of snow a year but it also sees on average 320 days of sunshine a year, which presents extreme UV conditions being located at an altitude of 8,100 feet.

However, twenty years ago in 2003 the exterior of this home was stained with Lifeline Ultra-2 Bronze and Advance Gloss topcoat. Two coats Ultra-2, one coat Advance and with little maintenance done since this home looks as great as it did the year it was first stained. What a great testimony to Lifeline stains and finishes. This beautiful finish has weathered the environment for over 20 years!   

Products Used:

Perma-Chink Systems History Over 40 Years

The Beginning

In 1980 my neighbor told me about building a log home in Eastern Washington. He said that he loved the home and the lifestyle but was disappointed that with the wind constantly blowing and harsh cold winters, there was no real effective way to seal the gaps between the logs. The house leaked air and heat, and wind-driven rain literally came right through the walls.

He tried various caulking materials with little success. Caulking around a bathtub or sink was significantly different from ‘caulking’ literally miles of seams between logs in a log house. After a number of conversations and experiments, it became apparent that there was no readily available product that could seal the gaps, look like authentic chinking, and last more than a few months.

After literally months of trial and error, it became apparent that if we were going to design a material that would be acceptable, we would have to design it ourselves.

Before you apply coatings to interior surfaces, always thoroughly wash them with a recommended cleaning solution. Log Wash is made for this purpose and should be used as follows:

Mix 1/2 cup of Log Wash Concentrate in a pail with one gallon of warm water. Apply the Log Wash solution to the wall with a rag or sponge. Allow the solution to remain on the wall, keeping it wet for at least 10-15 minutes. Using a clean rag or sponge and a pail of clean water, wipe the Log Wash solution off of the surface. Frequently rinse the sponge or rag in the pail of water and frequently exchange the water in the pail with clean water.

To make sure you have the correct amount of finish, read this Tech Tip on determining square footage, as log homes are built in various layouts which all affect square footage. 

Projects can be daunting if you have limited or no experience. You gain experience by doing, and getting expert advice when you need, whether it's before the project, during, or after. Our customer service exists to help all log home owners get the best results using the best products for their log or timber home.

One recent homeowner project done by our customer Beth H. required removing the old finish and sealant, then restoring the home with Lifeline Ultra-2 Natural and Energy Seal in Cedar. Lifeline Advance Gloss topcoat encapsulated the wood, ensuring a long-lasting finish and great look.

The Beginning of A Dream

Judy MacKnight retired as a school teacher and was pursuing an active interest in hiking and backpacking when she discovered the timeless link to our past represented by the Appalachian style log structures located in Cade’s Cove of the Tennessee Smoky Mountains National Park. Later her adventures would take her to the western United States where she observed that log homes and the people who lived in them was representative of the enduring American values of independence and self-sufficiency. Those qualities struck a resolute tone and she began to dream of living in a log home.

When Perma-Chink arrived on the log home scene over forty years ago, it revolutionized the industry in the best way possible. We developed a log home sealant that replaced and outperformed traditional mortar chinking.

Perma-Chink Log Home Sealant stretches with log movement and is vastly more flexible than the cement-based chinking of old. When log home builders and owners want the best log home chinking, what they really want is the best log home sealant: Perma-Chink.

If you're looking for some ideas this Thankgiving to partner with your baked, smoked, or deep-fried turkey (I've done all three and prefer smoked), we've compiled a list of recipes that you might find new and interesting to serve this year. 

Side Dishes

Stretching Your Dollar With Lifeline Ultra-2

For over 40 years Perma-Chink Systems has cared for log and timber homes through exceptional products designed to outlast and out-perform anything on the market. Getting the most for your money is something we can all identify with, and we endeavor to create significant value for our customers.

Perma-Chink Systems products protect and enhance more than just log homes.

Timber home finished in Lifeline Ultra-7 Rustic Gray & Advance Gloss

By Wayne Bell, LogHomeCareOnline.com

Log homes come in many varieties - milled, hand-scribed, square (Appalachian style) logs, D-logs, and more. Other forms of solid-timber construction include timber frame and post and beam homes, which provide flexibility to build the architectural style of home you desire, from rustic to modern, while employing modern building and energy-efficient construction methods. In this article, we’ll explore the differences between timber frame and post and beam homes compared to traditional log homes.

How should I go about making sure that I get started right when it comes to maintenance?  How critical is it to begin proper maintenance when the home is new? 

Research

Do your research in finding the right system. We provide a robust library of Tech Tips that provides information you need to take care of your log and timber home. New homes should not have issues, and we recommend homeowners perform inspections of their home to find any small issues and fix those now, before they become big issues. 

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